Mission & Ambition

Providing actionable information to create a safer, more secure world for humans & wildlife.

We are Robin Radar Systems. Technology leader in tracking and classification of small objects.

Our mission is to provide actionable information that increases safety and security for both humans and birds. And we do that by combining purpose built radars with unique software algorithms.

We achieve leadership in global niche markets by turning customers into ambassadors. And although we’re proud of our leading position, we don’t take it for granted.

Listed in the top three most innovative Dutch companies, we continue to research, develop, manufacture, and above all, innovate.

Our History

More than 30 years of applied radar science

ROBIN started in the eighties as a project within the well-respected Dutch Research Institute for Applied Science (TNO). The project name was an acronym for Radar Observation of Bird INtensity. The goal was to prevent collisions between birds and planes from the Royal Netherlands Air Force. In conjunction with the FlySafe initiative of the European Space Agency (ESA), TNO developed software algorithms to process raw radar images from air defence radars to visualise bird intensity.

In 2010 high-tech entrepreneur Siete Hamminga spun out the technology from TNO to make it commercially available:

"ROBIN is a great example of the explosive mixture you get when combining 30 years of scientific research with committed entrepreneurship.” 

Although there are no formal links between the organizations, TNO still serves as one of Robin's strategic suppliers, extending our R&D capacity.

In 2014 the Dutch government challenged the industry to come up with solutions against small drones. Thirty-eight companies responded. Robin Radar became number one and won the tender to develop a purpose-built drone detection radar. The radar was first operational in June 2015 to protect the G7 Summit in Germany.

In 2016 Robin Radar was recognised by the Dutch government as one of the top 3 most innovative SME companies of the Netherlands. (Source: MKB-top 100) 

The Royal Netherlands Air Force was our first customer way back in the eighties, and we’re proud that they’re still our one of our best customers today.

1904

The German inventor, Christian Hülsmeyer, was the first to use radio waves to detect 'the presence of distant metallic objects'. In 1904, he demonstrated the feasibility of detecting a ship in dense fog, but not yet its distance from the transmitter.

1904

1905

The first reported bird strike was by Orville Wright in 1905, and according to the Wright Brothers' diaries:

"Orville flew 4,751 meters in 4 minutes 45 seconds, four complete circles. Twice passed over fence into Beard's cornfield. Chased flock of birds for two rounds and killed one which fell on top of the upper surface and after a time fell off when swinging a sharp curve."

 

 

The Telegraph. Major Bird Strike Incidents. 2011 https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8581244/Major-bird-strike-incidents.html (accessed 28 May 2018).

1905

1912

The first recorded bird strike fatality was reported in 1912 when aero-pioneer Cal Rodgers collided with a gull which became jammed in his aircraft control cables. He crashed at Long Beach, California, was pinned under the wreckage and drowned.

 

The Telegraph. Major Bird Strike Incidents. 2011 https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8581244/Major-bird-strike-incidents.html (accessed 28 May 2018).

1912

1980

TNO starts a project for the Royal Netherlands Air Force using radar to detect birds. The project is called ROBIN, for ‘Radar Observation of Bird Intensity’.

1980

1996

Hercules Disaster Eindhoven Airport: 34 passengers died in a plane crash after birds hit two engines.

1996

2005

The European Space Agency (ESA) initiates a FlySafe project contributing to the further development of the ROBIN project.

2005

2009

In one of the most famous incidents of recent years, US Airways Flight 1549 from LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte/Douglas International Airport ditched into the Hudson River in 2009 after experiencing a loss of both turbines. It is suspected that the engine failure was caused by running into a flock of geese at an altitude of about 3,200 feet, shortly after takeoff. All 150 passengers and 5 crew members were safely evacuated after a successful water landing.

 

 

The Telegraph. Major Bird Strike Incidents. 2011 https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8581244/Major-bird-strike-incidents.html (accessed 28 May 2018).

 

 

 

2009

2010

Robin Radar Systems is born! The new company is officially registered as a limited liability company with the Chamber of Commerce.

2010

2010

Signing transfer of Intellectual Properties with the Netherlands organisation for applied scientific reasearch TNO.

2010

2011

Winning Eesti Energia Windfarm in Estonia.

2011

2012

Winning the European tender from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

2012

2012

Celebrating Phase II of the company

2012

2012

The Mainport Innovation Fund and Infek Capital invest millions in Robin Radar’s growth plan.

2012

2014

The Dutch government challenges the industry to provide solutions for detection and intervention of small drones. 38 companies respond and Robin Radar Systems ranks number 1.

2014

2014

Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague: 58 world leaders discuss how to prevent terrorists from getting their hands on nuclear material that could be used to make a nuclear wapon.

2014

2014

Robin Radar Systems participating in a trade mission to Rwanda. The Dutch Minister for Trade (Mrs. Ploumen) and Ambassador (Mrs. Cueleneare) introduce Robin Radar to the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Director General of Rwandan Civil Aviation Authority.

2014

2015

Robin Radar Systems participates in an official state visit of HRH King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima, to Denmark and Germany.

2015

2015

Protection G7

2015

2016

Chinese Sinotech and Dutch Robin Radar Systems start a joint venture in Beijing called Sinorobin, to serve the domestic market and capture its great potential.

2016

2016

The Dutch Chamber of Commerce identifies Robin Radar Systems in the top 3 of 100 most innovative Dutch companies.

2016

2016

Amsterdam Schiphol Airport is the world’s first civil airport covering 6 runways by integrating four Robin systems providing one full picture.

2016

2017

Launch Max: Launch of full 3-D birdradar Max® It's taken more than four years, millions of Euros, and thousands of coffees. The result is mind-blowing. We quite simply had no other choice, but to call it Max®.​​​​​​​

2017

2017

Royal Netherlands Air Force: The Royal Netherlands Air Force has signed a €7M deal with Robin Radar Systems to provide bird radars for bird strike avoidance at all its air bases in the Netherlands.

2017

2017

Robin Radar becomes ISO 9001 certified.

2017

2018

Woensdrecht Airbase: In early 2018 Robin Radar Systems opened an office at the military airbase. An ELVIRA Drone Detection Radar is installed there and demonstrations can be arranged.

2018

2018

Copenhagen: Full 3-D bird radar successfully installed at Copenhagen Airport, launching customer for the aviation market.

2018

2018

Bureau Waardenburg: Bureau Waardenburg, an independent research and advice consultant in the fields of ecology, nature, the environment and landscape design, serves as launching customer for Max in the Ecology sector. 

2018

Our Partners

None of us is as smart as all of us

At Robin, we know that we’re capable of achieving a lot, and indeed we have done.

But together, we can accomplish so much more.

Without all of our suppliers, investors, distributors, system integrators, and project partners, we wouldn’t be where we are today.

It was Isaac Newton who famously said, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

See the giants, both big and small, that we work with below.

And if you’re interested in becoming a partner yourself, let us know!

Rules We Live By

Our code of conduct

As written in the Shareholders Agreement, Robin Radar undertakes with each of the shareholders that it will comply with the principles of the UN Global Compact. These  contain ten principles derived from: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, and the United Nations Convention Against Corruption.
 
Below we briefly describe the ten principles. Please note that each underlined 'Principle' links to external sites with more detailed information.

  • Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and
  • Principle 2: Make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.
  • Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining;
  • Principle 4: The elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour;
  • Principle 5: The effective abolition of child labour; and
  • Principle 6: The elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.
  • Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;
  • Principle 8: Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and
  • Principle 9: Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.
  • Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.
     
    Regarding Principle 10, the Management Board has written a dedicated Anti-Bribery Code. You can download that here.

Interested in our company?

Let’s get in touch
Interested?